George Hoffman; Patriot?

My wife’s paternal line goes back to George Hoffman, born in Germany in 1736. Her grandfather kept a journal every day he was in college, starting in 1912. It includes stories of how he met his wife, and train travel to New York state to get married. After college, he kept journal entries on a less often weekly, and later only monthly, basis. But in the back of the journal is a Hoffman family tree. He got the info from his aunt; we don’t know where she got her information. But most of the tree, so far, seems to be fairly accurate, even though it has no sources.

Other documents have verified much of what is in the Hoffman journal family tree. Found out George Hoffman was born Johann Georg Hoffman, German for John George Hoffman. He Americanized his name after coming to Pennsylvania. The names of his wife and children are confirmed in other documents, including his will, written in 1801 in Cumberland, Pennsylvania.

[Pennsylvania, Wills and Probate Records, 1683-1993; George Hoffman will of 1801; Pennsylvania County, District and Probate Courts, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. Wills, Volume F, 1795-1803, pp. 294-300, images 506-509 of 542, images and database online, Ancestry.com : accessed 18 November 2018).]

Now, another user on Ancestry has made the claim that George Hoffman fought in the American Revolutionary War. They do not substantiate that claim with sources. I have sent an ancestry message to this person asking what sources they have, how can they prove their claim, and they have not responded. If George did fight in the American Revolutionary War, he is an American Patriot that would qualify my wife for membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR).

So, another thing on the Research To Do list is to answer the research question, did this George Hoffman actually fight in the American Revolutionary War? I am actively searching for information; if you have any tips, let me know. When I find an answer, I’ll post it here.

Stephen Bachiler

Happy Thanksgiving!

I’m a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Their magazine American Ancestors, Fall 2018, has an interesting article by Robert Charles Anderson starting on page 29. They have been publishing books by Mr. Anderson called The Great Migration series, which gives information on the many people that left England for the American colonies, including the Mayflower passengers, and for the great migration of people about 50 years after the Mayflower. I have access to their online database, which includes some data from their Great Migration books.

They are coming out with a new book soon, to be released in December 2018, called Puritan Pedigrees: The Deep Roots of the Great Migration to New England. It outlines the growth of the Puritan network, and the reasons why many of the pilgrims came to America.

Stephen Bachiler is my 11th great grandfather.  This lineage includes Matthew Gooding Reed and Ruth Anne Smith, which leads me to both American Patriot John Lecky (DAR and SAR) and to George Soule, Mayflower passenger. But another branch of that lineage leads to Stephen Bachiler.

Stephen Bachiler was not a Mayflower passenger, but is mentioned by name in the magazine article, and mentioned in more detail in the book, to be published soon. He was a great influence on the Great Migration, leaving England and coming to Massachusetts. He left mainly due to religious persecution.

According to the magazine article, Stephen Bachiler was born about 1561 in England, was a radical Puritan in his university days, and in the early 1600s was deprived of earning a living as a minister because he disagreed with English royalty on some points. He was vicar of Wherwill, Hampshire in England until 1605 when he was deprived of his job by the government. He was being punished because he disagreed with the English crown.

If you will recall, Henry VIII was a Catholic, wanted to divorce his wife to marry another, the pope refused, and so Henry started the Church of England, so he could basically be his own pope and make his own religious decisions. Every Protestant English monarch since then has been the head of the Church of England.  The king or queen rules their country and their church. They do not have separation of church and state there. (A basic American belief.)

Stephen Bachiler sailed to New England in 1631, mainly to escape persecution and government policies. He was an independent thinker and wanted freedom.

For more information, consult American Ancestors magazine, Fall 2018, pp. 29-34, or the upcoming book Puritan Pedigrees: The Deep Roots of the Great Migration to New England, releasing next month (late December 2018) and available here.

American_Ancestor_fall2018    Puritan_Pedigrees

It is fascinating to know that my ancestor is one of the big movers and shakers on why so many people left England for the Americas. Stephen Bachiler was an influence to be reckoned with, and was well respected in his time for challenging royalty and escaping England to come to the Americas.

And on this Thanksgiving, I’m thankful that we live in America, where these ideas of freedom of religion, freedom of the press, and the freedom to think any way you wish are not only allowed, but encouraged. And many of these ideas of freedom were promoted by my ancestors!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Stanislaus Rosemarynoski immigration

Stanislaus Rosemarynoski is my great grandfather. He was born in Poland. Now, Poland did not exist as a country when he came to America. Germany had invaded from one side and Russia invaded from the other. So various papers list his home country as Russia, with him speaking Polish. Basically, he was Polish in Russian occupied Poland. After WW I, Poland became a country again when the map was redrawn after the war.  Various online sources provide a brief or lengthy history of Poland.

Different sources give different information on his date of birth. Marriage records and passenger lists indicate a birthday of 7 January 1897. The 1920 US Federal Census suggests 1889, while the 1930 US Federal Census suggests 1890 (this discrepancy is common with Census records). His WW II draft registration card and his death certificate indicate 7 January 1890. And his Naturalization records indicate 7 January 1891. When a date is given, 7 January is consistent.  But the actual year various from 1897-1891.Stanislaus Rosemarynoski

He arrived at Ellis Island in New York in 1909.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The passenger list for arrival in New York is below in two images.

Stanislaw Rosmarinowski passenger list 1909 New York arrival Astanislaw Rosmarinowski passenger list 1909 New York arrival B.png

Ancestry.com. New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.  Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897. Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls. NAI: 6256867. Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36. National Archives at Washington, D.C.  https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=nypl&h=4033150053&indiv=try&o_vc=Record:OtherRecord&rhSource=1068 accessed 5 Mar 2018.

Stanislaw Rosemarynoski is on line 2 of the passenger list. He sailed on the SS President Grant, departing from Hamburg on 8 May 1909 and arriving in New York on 20 May 1909. His age is 21 years, placing his date of birth about 1888. His father is listed as Wojceck Rosmaryinowski, and his final US destination is Norwich, Connecticut to visit a friend named Jan (?) Karnocki.

His Marriage Record is in a post about his wife, my great grandmother, here.

His immigration papers are below, in three images as three pages.

Stanislaw Rozmarynowski US Naturalization Papers page 1

Stanislaw Rozmarynowski US Naturalization page 2.png

Stanislaw Rozmarynowski US Naturalization page 3.png

United States of America, Stanislaw Rozmarynowski Naturalization File, Declaration of Intention (Superior Court of Hampshire County, Massachusetts, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 24 April 1937), US Department of Homeland Security, US Citizenship and Immigration Services Genealogy Program 1200 First Street NE Washington, D.C. 20529-2206, File No. 4359, obtained by sending hardcopy request. Declaration of Intention to become a US Citizen.

The blank areas are “redactions” from the Federal Government. Their opinion is to provide privacy for anyone such as children who may still be living. I disagree with this position, as the document is used for genealogy, so any time someone redacts genealogical information, it can be rather frustrating.

From this document, we can see he waited a while before he filled out Naturalization papers. His Declaration of Intention to become a US Citizen didn’t happen until 1937. His petition for Naturalization to become a US Citizen didn’t happen until 7 Sept 1939. Why is this date important? World War II started on 1 Sept 1939, just a few days earlier, when Germany invaded Poland. Germany had invaded Poland years earlier, and at the end of WW I the map of Europe was redrawn, and Poland was “taken” from Germany and became the country of Poland again. How did WW II start? Germany wanted Poland back, and invaded with blitzkrieg tactics. There were certainly other considerations, but Poland was invaded by Germany on 1 Sept 1939. Within a week, Stanislaus filed to become a US Citizen. Perhaps he was afraid he would be shipped back to Poland, away from his wife and family, to a country that was now embroiled in war, and that he hadn’t lived in for over 30 years. He actually becomes a US Citizen a few weeks later, in December 1939.

Later in WW II, more men were required to register for the draft, even if they never served. There was something called the “old man’s draft” for men born between 1877 and 1897. In 1942, this would have been for men aged about 45-65. They never were drafted, but they registered nonetheless. Below is the draft registration card for Stanislaus, with two images.

Stanislaw Rosmarinoski WWII draft registration A.png

Stanislaw Rosmarinoski WWII draft registration B

Ancestry.com, U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 (Lehi, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010), Ancestry.com, The National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; World War II Draft Cards (Fourth Registration) for the State of Massachusetts; Record Group Title: Records of the Selective Service System, 1926-1975; Record Group Number: 147; Series Number: M2090.

This document gives us some more information, including name of wife and date of birth. This confirmed we have the right person.

The second page, or back side of the card, indicates he had red hair. This was information very important for my mother! Her father had jet black hair, but she had some aunts with bright red hair! Now she knows the red hair did not come in a bottle, but was inherited from their father Stanislaus.

Finding such documents is part of the fun of genealogy!

 

My Polish Immigrant Ancestors: Rosalie Bruderik

My maternal grandfather was named Rosemarynoski. His parents, my great grandparents, immigrated from Poland. But when, and from where?

My Rosemarynoski great grandfather died in 1948 in Massachusetts. My mother was born and raised in Kansas and never met him. My Rosemarynoski grandfather had four daughters, including my mom, and no sons. He had almost all sisters; he had a brother, but he died relatively young with no wife or children. So really, the Polish Rosemarynoski surname is all women now and so the name is not passed down to any other generations for this branch of the family.

While my great grandfather died in 1948, my great grandmother died in 1981. Her name was Rosalie Bruderik, and she married Stanislaus Rosemarynoski. So her married name was Rose Rosemarynoski. Rose and Stanislaus were Polish immigrants.

When I was a kid in the 1970s, my mom travelled to Massachusetts to visit her grandmother and her aunts. She remembers a big box in the backyard filled with photos and immigration documents. While others ate food picnic style, she remembers looking at this rich history of Polish immigration. She remembers seeing American citizenship papers for her grandparents, and old photos. It was a lovely rich history in documents. A genealogist’s dream!

In 1981, when her grandmother died, she reached out to her aunts and cousins, asking about that box of documents. No one knew anything about it. No one remembered what she was talking about, and no box of papers or photos existed. The storage rooms and houses had no such thing, it did not exist. For the genealogist, this is a tragedy. Lost documents are something we never wish on anyone. No one can be blamed, it is no one’s fault. But the genealogist and family historian has a primary mission to save, scan, preserve and share documents and photos. It’s sad that such a thing happened. And every genealogist, unfortunately, has a similar story. So, when I started, I had to find the documents all by myself. There was no scrapbook or box of papers to look at for the Rosemarynoski family.

The first fun document was the marriage record of Rose and Stanislaus.

Stanislaus Rosemarynoski and Rose Broderick Marriage Record image

New England Historic Genealogical Society; Boston, Massachusetts; Massachusetts Vital Records, 1911–1915. Massachusetts, Marriage Records, 1840-1915, page 300, line 100; Marriage record of Stanislaus Rosemarynoski and Rose Bruderick, June 26, 1911. Ancestry.com, 2013, Provo, UT, USA. https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=2511&h=908897304&ssrc=pt&tid=114630085&pid=130135263695&usePUB=true
On this image, look at line 100, which lists the details for the marriage record of Rose and Stanislaus. It provides the age of both at the time of marriage (Rosalie was 19), the address for each, and the occupation. Both were born in Poland, Russia; at the time, Poland was not a country, but had been invaded by both Germany and Poland, but the language they spoke was Polish. This record also names the parents of both bride and groom. Notice the mother of the bride is listed only as Anna, with no last name. For whatever reason, Rosalie did not know the maiden name of her own mother.

The next fun document is the passenger list for Rosalie. This comes in two images, left and right, both pages of a large ledger type document.

Rosalia Bruderick passenger list 1907

Rosalia Bruderick passenger list 1907 b.jpg

Year: 1907; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 0954; Line: 27; Page Number: 78.

https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=7488&h=4012763714&tid=114630085&pid=130135263695&usePUB=true&_phsrc=SQt52&_phstart=successSource

Line 27 on both pages lists the details for Rosalie Broderick. She was 18 years old, and coming from a town in Russia (Poland) called  perhaps Dąbrowa. At this point, I need help from someone who knows more about Poland than I do. But we have a hometown. The nearest relative from home is listed as living in Łomża. I do not see a name of either parent listed as nearest relative, so I wonder if both of her parents are already deceased, which may be one of the reasons for her immigration to America. The nearest relative in America she is coming to see is her uncle, [illegible] Bruderik, living in Haydenville, Massachusetts. Of course, this makes sense, as she lives the rest of her life in Haydenville, and that’s where her children, including my grandfather, were born. At the top of the pages, we notice she arrived on the SS Potsdam, departing from Rotterdam on 20 July 1907, arriving at Ellis Island in New York on 30 July 1907.

Read more about her ship in another blog post here.

Now, this raises questions. If she was 19 when she was married in 1911, then in 1907 she would have been only 15 when she came to America. But the passenger list says she was 18, which sometimes has been transcribed as only 10. Sometimes young men lie about their age to serve in the military. An older person gets better privileges. Perhaps she fibbed a little about her age to obtain the privilege of sailing to America. This is in a time before passports and driver’s license documents. The reality is, she was young and likely sailing alone. No one else on that page is from her hometown.

With a request for Immigration and Naturalization papers, we find that Rosalie never became a US Citizen. We cannot determine why this is so, and we cannot ask her. In looking at various documents, she never signed her name, but made her mark with an “x” with a witness, which suggests she never learned how to read and write. I remember her son, my grandpa, talking about how she was such a good cook, making Polish kielbasa at home. But if she never learned how to read and write, then a cookbook was never used. She had all the recipes memorized!

This is a lot of information about the immigration of my great grandmother, Rosalie Bruderik. I have other documents once she was in America, but this is what I have concerning her travel to America.

Lucky Find: Behrman family tree to Passenger List

My great grandmother Frieda Behrman Cross hand wrote a family tree years ago. I somehow got a copy of it. I think she may have written out the family tree from memory. She may have used an old Family Bible as a resource, but if so, no one knows where that Family Bible was, or where it is today.

Of course, there were no sources. It was just a list of families, mother and father with children, for several generations.

But the Lucky Find was this; she wrote when her father’s family immigrated to America. She was born in America, and so was a natural born US Citizen. But her father sailed to America when he was only 6 years old, when the family all came together. She wrote the year of immigration as 1857. Somehow, the family had forgotten about this nice little fact. We knew German ancestors were part of our family tree, but who came to America and when? No one knew.

Great grandma Frieda wrote the family all together, which would have been her grandparents, her father and his siblings, as coming to America in 1857. That’s the only detail I had.

I did a search online, and on ancestry I found this little gem: the family sailed to America from Germany and arrived on 3 Oct. 1857.

NYM237_179-0243

[Ancestry.com, New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010), Ancestry.com, Year: 1857; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237, 1820-1897; Microfilm Roll: Roll 179; Line: 38; List Number: 1173.]

And there we are, beginning on line 38, we get the listing of the same family that great grandma wrote in her family tree. Line 38 is Johann Behrmann, also known as John, Frieda’s grandfather, and a few lines below at the age of 6 is another Johann Behrmann, the father of Frieda, born in 1851 and so 6 years old in 1857.

They left Hanover, Germany, and their point of departure by sea was Bremen, Germany, and they arrived in New York on 3 Oct. 1857 aboard the Adonis, quite a name for a ship! With a little searching online, I can find other information about the Adonis here. A few years later, the Adonis was shipwrecked with a shipment of coal. Thankfully, my ancestors were safe in America by then! There is also an online site with a list of German immigrants and the ship they sailed on! Much more information can be found with some online searches!

Great grandma’s family tree was a little gem, that contained a Lucky Find. Her simple fact of immigration in 1857 lead to finding a passenger list, information about the ship, which verifies her fact with documented sources, and their hometown of Hanover in Germany.

I love these types of Lucky Finds!